Write for the Reader

It’s common knowledge that an author must target a book toward a particular audience. Well, this is also true for freelance article writers.

As freelance writers, we need to focus on our audience/readership, first and then strive to satisfy their needs or desires. What information are they seeking? What can you bring to readers that they want to know about? And, when you are contemplating an article on a particular topic, consider, do they need this information? What do they need/want to know about this subject?

Many writers simply want to write what they want to write. They have a pet topic and sometimes they get really involved in writing an article about it without first checking to see what is needed on this topic. It’s wise to write about what you know, but, if you also hope to begin a freelance career or you simply want to sell a few articles on this topic, you’re going to need a different approach.

Rather than burying your head in your work and writing the article that you want to push, you must first get acquainted with your audience. Who is interested in this topic and your slant on it? What magazines/newsletters/websites might publish the piece as you’ve written it? What else is out there on this subject? Has this article been done before many times over or is it fresh material presented in a new way?

Folks, before you start thinking about what you can produce or what you want to say or, even worse, what you think others should read, consider your audience: their desires and needs.

Discover magazines that this audience typically reads and then work from the inside out, not the outside in.

In other words, do your research and then write an appropriate article for an appropriate publication or site directed toward the right audience.

My article on “Secrets to a Better Author Presentation appears in this morning’s Book Promotion Newsletter. ”

Here’s another tidbit you may enjoy. It’s an article (not one I wrote) on “22 Reasons to Stop Writing.” Clever and cute.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2012/03/13/22-more-reasons-to-stop-writing.html

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